Barber’s frustrated with building your barber business

frustrationHave you been frustrated while trying to build your barber business? Don’t worry we all have been there before and broke past those walls that once stood in our way. This article may give you that inspiration and insight that you need to see your way to the next level in the barber business. I posted a status on the Facebook Fan Page and asked you guys what frustrated you the most about building your barber business, so I wanted to give you some advice on what I’ve used in the past to deal with some of those same problems. Before I dive into my suggestions let me first say that if you want to change your results then you have to change your thinking. The way you think about your business is by far the foundation of how you operate and in return get business. Here are some tips…

Do you have unfaithful customers?

Unfaithful customers are one of the biggest concerns for new and experienced barbers around the country. If a customer decides not to return to you for service don’t panic. Sit back and observe your service and ask yourself what causes a customer to become unfaithful. Most often customers don’t return because a barber is inconsistent, not available, or not in a good environment. When you service your customer treat them like royalty and spoil them. Seriously! And do it every time they come back exactly how you did it the time before that. The customer will get so use to this service it will be hard for them to leave you for another barber, especially the picky customers. Open your schedule to your customers and let them know what hours and days you will be working. Allow them to set appointments with you in advance and be on time for their appointment. Being available and consistent can really go a long way for even a decent barber. If at all possible try to keep your environment friendly to making money. How you do this will be different for every barber in different shops because we all have unique clientele. However take notice of the type of customers you bring in and if most of them don’t cuss then try to limit cussing in the shop (just an example).

Don’t know how many heads you’re going to cut this week?

Try to train your customers to set an appointment with you. I actually have most of my clientele on standing appointments which means I cut the same people every week at the same time. This is a very predictable means of income as a barber. In the beginning of my career I used an appointment book to pencil in my customer, but now I’ve been able to train everyone to set appointments online using my Genbook service. However you choose to set your appointments, doing this is the only way to get any predictability of your weekly income. Also documenting your income is a good way to know if you are growing, holding steady, or making less than what you use to make.

Does your customer not want to pay your prices?

I recently posted a question on Facebook and asked barbers what they typically charged for a haircut in their area. The prices ranged from $10 – $30 which is a pretty big gap. If you’re looking to up your prices for your customers the best way to do this is to stay firm and express the value that you provide to them that they won’t get from most other barbers. Small things such as a hot towel and razor edge up or even being on time for your appointments so your customers don’t have a long wait has a lot of value. I charge $15 for children and $20 for adults with no complaints from any of my customers. In fact I usually receive a good tip between $3-10 almost every time. Remember that every customer will not want to pay your higher price and they may try to haggle you back down or threaten you by going to another barber. You must stay firm with your decision and if your value is really worth the price then another customer will fill their spot.

Are you working long hours and don’t have any time on the weekend to enjoy yourself?

Welcome to the club… this is a good thing at first. At this point you need to begin to train your customers to set appointments and learn to manage your time to fit your needs. You would be surprised to see that if you cut your nights at the shop shorter, your customers will find time to come to you during the day or other open spots you have. Don’t let your customers control your schedule after you have established a decent amount of repeat clients. Managing your clientele is an important system of your business to learn that will eventually solve your problem with long hours in the shop.

I hope these tips inspire you to look at the way you do business in a different way. Try them out and see how it works for you then come back and let me know what you think.

3 thoughts on “Barber’s frustrated with building your barber business”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *